2016 Moog Hackathon Winners

Building New Instruments with Moog Parts in 48 hours

 

The 2016 Moog Hackathon began Saturday morning with forty participants and a table piled with Moog parts. Forty-eight hours later, one sleep-deprived team walked away with a creation that could only be described as a “scrambobulator.” The Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology hosted the Hackathon which generated a huge range of musical instruments. Winners Greg Hendler and Mark Crowley (who won last year for a breath-controlled synthesizer guitar) said the competition was much harder this year and they really had no idea who would win on Sunday night. The competition included an effects system for bass guitar with multiple foot switches to allow the player to select a desired sound; a Werkstatt interface for iPads and iPhones; a box that projects colors and generates sound according to color; a playable electronic necktie; a multi-person interactive phone case; and even an electronic flute. After all the instrument demos, these projects were the winners:

  Click Here to Download Images of the Hackathon

 

FIRST PLACE :: THE BIG EARED SCRAMBLER

 

Created by Greg Hendler and Mark Crowley, the instrument is an accordion type synthesizer that is described as the "scrambobulator". Greg and Mark were awarded entry into the Guthman Musical Instrument Competition, a Moog Werkstatt, and a $3000 dollar cash prize.

SECOND PLACE :: THE SEE-SAW

 

Created by Jonathan Wang, Nikhil Bhanu, and Avrosh Kumar, their instrument is an interactive iPhone and iPad case used to create music with friends. They were awarded a Moog Werkstatt and $2000 dollar cash prize.

THIRD PLACE :: THE ELECTRO-FLUTE

 

Created by Kenneth Swanson and Samuel Greene, their instrument converts wind into electronic synthesizer sounds that are controlled by touch. They were awarded a Moog Werkstatt and $1000 dollar cash prize.

HONORABLE MENTION :: THE KINECT THEREMIN

 

Created by Andy Pruett, his instrument used body gestures to create synthesizer sounds.